Big chief wahoo and comic strip

Duration: 7min 31sec Views: 1610 Submitted: 12.03.2021
Category: Scissoring
Elmer Woggon, sometimes shortened as "Wog", is best remembered for two newspaper comics, 'Skylark' and 'Big Chief Wahoo' , beter known under its revamped title 'Steve Roper and Mike Nomad'. Woggon is an interesting case of an artist whose contributions to comic history were both significant as well as minimal, to say the least. His 'Skylark' was one of the first aviation comics, yet failed because he lacked enough knowledge about the subject. In less than a decade the entire series was gradually taken away from him and changed almost unrecognizably in both artwork, plot, characters and even title. Under its new name, 'Steve Roper and Mike Nomad', it became one of the classic newspaper comics and far outlived the original comedic antics of Chief Wahoo. Last but not least Woggon is also the man who motivated Allen Saunders to become a comic writer.

Big Chief Wahoo 1

Kleefeld on Comics: On Strips: Big Chief Wahoo

JavaScript must be enabled to use this site. Please enable JavaScript in your browser and refresh the page. Auction in progress, bid now! Weekly Auction ends Monday May 17!

Big Chief Wahoo and Race in Comic Strips

His engagement to the shapely Princess Minnie Ha-Cha was mostly played for laughs. By , however, his adventures took on a somewhat more serious tone. An exploration of Big Chief Wahoo as a rare Native American lead of a comic strip, however humorous, is long over due.
No recent wiki edits to this page. Chief Wahoo was a Native American of unknown tribe who became a multi-millionaire when oil was discovered on his land. Not needing to work he spend most of his time traveling, first with someone known as the Great Gusto, a man who bore a striking resemblance to W. Fields both in looks and demeanor, an always scheming con-artist he and Chief Wahoo parted ways once they reached New York where Wahoo was reunited with his niece Minnie-Ha-Cha, from there he traveled with her as she made her way though show business, first on Broadway then in Hollywood. Eventually written out of his own strip, he was replaced by reporter Steve Roper and detective Mike Nomad.