Married woman having sex in bur said

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The Girls Who Went Away

The Girls Who Went Away - Ann Fessler

Metrics details. Experiences of community-level violence and personal trauma increase the likelihood that young people will engage in risky behaviors that include smoking, drug use, and unsafe sex. Little is known about the sexual behavior of young people in the region, particularly in the occupied Palestinian territory oPt. Our aim in this study was to gain an insight into the perceived prevalence and patterns of sexual behavior among Palestinian youth. The study was based on ten focus groups and 17 in-depth interviews with young people aged years as part of the formative phase of a cross-sectional representative study of risk behaviors in the West Bank, including Jerusalem, in

Chapter Six. Men, Marriage And Modernity

We integrate theoretical traditions on the social construction of gender, heterosexuality, and marriage with research and theory on emotion work to guide a qualitative investigation of how married people understand and experience sex in marriage. Results, based on 62 in-depth interviews, indicate that married men and women tend to believe that sex is integral to a good marriage and that men are more sexual than women. Sexual activity in the context of long-term heterosexual relationships may be an important site of conflict as well as relationship vitality. Married people, however, face potentially conflicting discourses around sex.
In this deeply moving work, Ann Fessler brings to light the lives of hundreds of thousands of young single American women forced to give up their newborn children in the years following World War II and before Roe v. The Girls Who Went Away tells a story not of wild and carefree sexual liberation, but rather of a devastating double standard that has had punishing long-term effects on these women and on the children they gave up for adoption. In , Fessler, an adoptee herself, traveled the country interviewing women willing to speak publicly about why they relinquished their children.